2016 State Election Results

Public Policy Alert

| November.10.2016

With the 2016 Presidential Election dominating political news for more than a year, it was easy to miss the important races at the state level—races that often have a far more direct impact on our clients' businesses and everyday life.

What follows is a brief summary of the most important races and changes that occurred. Over the next few days, we will be working on a more comprehensive piece that will analyze what a Trump presidency, Republican-controlled Congress, and the changes at the state level will mean for businesses in a myriad of industries, including technology, finance, and energy. In the meantime, please don't hesitate to contact the Orrick state public policy team at [email protected] if you have any questions about what election night means for you and your business.

Overview:

Republicans made gains in statewide offices, winning in three Governor's races in states that were controlled by Democrats (Vermont, New Hampshire and Missouri) and flipping two Attorney General offices (Missouri, and New Hampshire where the Governor appoints).

Republicans also gained complete control of two state legislatures, Kentucky (State House was controlled by Democrats) and Iowa (State Senate was controlled by Democrats), and according to our sources on the ground, are poised to take control of both chambers in Minnesota.

Democrats gained complete control of two state legislatures, Nevada (both houses were controlled by Republicans) and New Mexico (State House was controlled by Republicans).

Current Control:

Governors

Attorneys General

State Legislatures

  • Arizona
    • State Senate – Republicans Maintain Control (17 R – 13 D)
  • Colorado
    • State House – Too Close to Call (34 D – 31 R): Previously Democratic Control
    • State Senate – Too Close to Call (18 R – 17 D): Previously Republican Control
  • Delaware
    • Governor – John Carney (D) def. Colin Bonini (R): Previously Democratic Control
    • State Senate – As a result of Senator Hall-Long's election to Lt. Governor, the Senate is now split 10-10 (D-R). Senate President Pro Tem Blevins also lost her race, which means that a new Pro Tem will be leading this chamber in January—likely Senator David McBride (D).
  • Iowa
    • State Senate – Republican Gain (29 R 18 D): Previously Democratic Control
  • Illinois
    • State House – Democrats Maintain Control, Lose Supermajority (67 D – 51 R)
  • Indiana
    • Governor – Eric Holcomb (R) def. John Gregg (D): Previously Republican Control
    • Attorney General – Curtis Hill (R) def. Lorenzo Arredondo (D): Previously Republican Control
  • Kentucky
    • State House – Republican Gain (63 R – 36 D): Previously Democratic Control
  • Massachusetts
    • State House – Democrats Maintain Supermajority Control (124 D – 33 R)
    • State Senate – Democrats Maintain Supermajority Control (34 D – 6 R)
  • Maine
    • State Senate – Republicans Maintain Control (17 R – 10 D, 7 Too Close to Call)
  • Michigan
    • State House – Republicans Maintain Control (63 R – 45 D, 2 Too Close to Call)
  • Minnesota
    • State House – Republicans Maintain Control (70 R – 55 D, 8 Too Close to Call)
    • State Senate – Republican Gain (34 R – 33 D): Previously Democratic Control
  • Missouri
    • Governor – Eric Geitens (R) def. Chris Koster (D): Previously Democratic Control
    • Attorney General  Josh Hawley (R) def. Teresa Hensley (D): Previously Democratic Control
  • Montana
    • Governor Incumbent Steve Bullock (D) def. Greg Gianforte (R)
    • Attorney General Incumbent Tim Fox (R) def. Larry Jent (D)
  • North Carolina
    • Governor – Too Close to Call, Incumbent Pat McCrory (R) and Roy Cooper (D)
    • Attorney General Josh Stein (D) def. Buck Newton (R): Previously Democratic Control
  • North Dakota
    • Governor – Doug Burgum (R) def. Marvin Nelson (D): Previously Republican Control
  • New Hampshire
    • Governor – Chris Sununu (R) def. Colin Van Ostern (D): Previously Democrat Control
    • Attorney General – To be Appointed by New Republican Governor: Previously Democratic Control
    • State House – Republicans Maintain Control (220 R – 180 D)
    • State Senate – Republicans Maintain Control (13 R – 11 D)
  • New Mexico
    • State House – Democratic Gain (37 D – 31 R, 2 Too Close to Call): Previously Republican Control
    • State Senate – Democrats Maintain Control (22 D – 16 R, 2 Too Close to Call)
  • Nevada
    • State House – Democratic Gain (27 D – 15 R): Previously Republican Control
    • State Senate – Democratic Gain (11 D – 10 R): Previously Republican Control
  • New York
    • State Senate – Republicans Maintain Control (32 R 31 D)
  • Oregon
    • Governor – Incumbent Kate Brown (D) def. Bud Pierce (R)
    • Attorney General  Incumbent Ellen Rosenblum (D) def. Daniel Crowe (R)
    • State House – Democrats Maintain Control (34 D – 25 R, 1 Too Close to Call)
    • State Senate – Democrats Maintain Control (17 D – 12 R, 1 Too Close to Call)
  • Pennsylvania
    • Attorney General   Josh Shapiro (D) def. John Rafferty (R): Previously Democratic Control
    • State House – Republicans Maintain Control (206 R – 46 D)
  • Utah
    • Governor  Incumbent Gary Herbert (R) def. Mike Weinholtz (D)
    • Attorney General  Incumbent Sean Reyes (R) def. Jon Harper (D)
  • Vermont
    • Governor – Phil Scott (R) def. Sue Minter (D): Previously Democratic Control
    • State House – Democrats Maintain Control (98 D – 52 R)
    • State Senate – Democrats Maintain Control (23 D – 7 R)
  • Washington
    • Governor – Incumbent Jay Inslee (D) def. Bill Bryant (R)
    • Attorney General  Incumbent Bob Ferguson (D) def. Joshua Trumbull (Lib)
    • State House – Democrats Maintain Control (51 D – 47 R)
    • State Senate – Republicans Maintain Control (25 R – 24 D)
  • Wisconsin
    • State Senate – Republicans Maintain Control (20 R – 12 D, 1 Too Close to Call)
  • West Virginia
    • Governor  Jim Justice (D) def. Bill Cole (R): Previously Democratic Control
    • Attorney General  Incumbent Patrick Morrisey (R) def. Doug Reynolds (D)
    • State Senate – Republicans Maintain Control (18 R – 16 D)